Project Description

African Watering Hole

It’s not really Kenya, but it is the next best thing. Imagine that you are transported to a watering hole near Mount Kenya National Park in Kenya, Africa.

All of the animals you see here come to watering holes during the dry season. They would not all share the watering hole at the same time. Instead, some animals would come during the day, others at night, and none of them would stick around while a lioness ate her prey!

Here in the highlands of Kenya there’s a dry season and a rainy season. From October to April, 70-90% of the year’s rain falls, turning the dry land into floodplains. From May to September almost no rain falls. By the end of the dry season many of the area’s lakes and rivers dry up. All that are left are watering holes – small ditches of water, like the one in this exhibit. These watering holes are key to sustaining life in the region. Animals may travel great distances to reach one.

Watering holes like this one become a magnet for all sorts of creatures. Many herbivores (plant eaters) share the watering hole at one time. Zebras and antelopes frequently drink together.

Nocturnal animals use the watering hole only at night. Shy animals like dik-diks don’t often congregate with other animals. And when a predator such as a lion, leopard, or hyena comes along, many animals run for their lives.

Brindled Gnu (Blue Wildebeest) (Connochaetes taurinus)
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Bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptu)
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Secretary Bird (Sagittarius serpentarius)
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Dik-Dik (Madoqua kirkii)
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Impala (Aepyceros melampus)
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Fun Fact

Lion (Panthera leo)
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Diet